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Letting and Estate Agent in Chelsea

About Chelsea

Chelsea began life as a Saxon Village; the name is derived from the Saxon word cealc hythe. This means chalky landing place so it may have been a chalky landing place for boats. In the middle ages it was a small village but in the 16th and 17th centuries it became more a fashionable place for wealthy people.

Thomas Moore lived in Chelsea; his house was unfortunately demolished in 1740. In 1536 Henry VIII had a manor house built but again it was demolished in 1760.

The Worshipful Company of Apothecaries founded the Physic Garden in 1673; here apprentices would be trained in identifying plants. Chelsea was soon known as a large village and in the 18th century it was flourishing but by the end of that century it was slowly beginning to be engulfed by London.

Kings Road was a private road in the 17th and 18th centuries, running to the royal palace at Hampton Court.
Sloane Square is named after Sir Hans Sloane who was physician to Queen Anne, George I and George II.

During the 19th century Chelsea was well known for the many writers who chose to live here such as the poet Leigh Hunt, Oscar Wilde, Thomas Carlyle, George Elliot and Henry James to name but a few.

Nowadays it is still very vibrant, renowned for its architecture, shops, restaurants bars and theatre. Properties prices are high but that does not stop people buying or renting in the area. The Chelsea society aim to protect and foster the amenities which is the reason that visitors continue to come. Underground stations are Sloane Square and South Kensington is just a short walk’s distance from Kings Road.